Catching Katy

Reads, Eats, & Everything Else


Leave a comment

Pork Egg Roll in a Bowl

This is a delicious recipe that my sister-in-law made for us and shared with me. Plus it’s quick and healthy! We love asian food and this is a great way to make some at home. Add some rice and some frozen wontons from Costco and it’s a perfect meal! We made one recipe and it fed 2 of us for 2 nights (so 4 servings). We’ll double it next time so we can stretch it a little longer and for some lunches. See some steps here and get the full recipe below. Enjoy!

Gather your ingredients and do some prep (chopping onion) because none of the steps take long. Please excuse the haphazard ingredient pics!

First sauté the onions and garlic. My husband doesn’t like the white part of green onions, so we left those out but I love them. Just a personal preference!

Add the pork, ginger, salt, pepper, and Sriracha. We used the full tablespoon of Sriracha and it definitely had a kick to it. If you’re afraid of spice, you may want to cut back the first time you make it until you figure out how much you want (if any). Sauté until pork is cooked.

Add the coleslaw mix, soy sauce, and rice vinegar. Sauté until coleslaw is tender.

Serve topped with green onion and sesame seeds if you have it. We didn’t have sesame seeds and I don’t think we lost anything.


Pork Egg Roll in a Bowl

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp. sesame oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 C onion, diced
  • 5 green onions, sliced, white and green parts separated
  • 1 lb. ground pork
  • 1/2 tsp. ground ginger
  • sea salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1 Tbsp. Sriracha
  • 14 oz. bag coleslaw mix
  • 3 Tbsp. soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp. rice vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp. toasted sesame seeds (optional)

Instructions

  1. Heat sesame oil in large skillet on medium heat.
  2. Add garlic, onions, and white part of the green onions. Sauté until onions are translucent and tender.
  3. Add ground pork, ground ginger, sea salt, black pepper, and Sriracha. Sauté until pork is cooked.
  4. Add coleslaw mix, soy sauce, and rice vinegar. Sauté until coleslaw is tender.
  5. Serve, topping with green onion and sesame seeds.

Find the original recipe here: Peace, Love, & Low Carb


Leave a comment

Fig Jam

In the process of buying our house a few months ago, we were at the house a number of times for various walk-throughs and inspections. But it wasn’t until after we moved in that we noticed the large tree on the side of the house with something growing on it. After some picture sharing and investigating, we determined that it is a fig tree! And it is a beautiful fig tree.

Over the next couple of weeks, I would mention this to people and so many would reply that they love figs and/or volunteered to make fig jam. Well I immediately started doing some research. When are figs ripe? How do you know they’re ripe? What do you do after you pick them? I learned more about figs in a week than I had known my entire life!

Well, fast forward a few weeks. We got back into town from a long weekend in DC and discovered that the figs were ripe (a good month before everything I read said they would be). We proceeded to fill a large basket with figs on that one day. And the next day. And the next day. We picked that entire week and luckily read that you could freeze them before making jam. Just rinse, cut off them stems, and freeze in a freezer bag! We ended up with about 4 gallon-size bags of figs. Just make sure you thaw them before canning.

My mother-in-law and brother-in-law were two of the first to volunteer to make jam, so that weekend they came over and we got to work. It was not difficult, just a little time-consuming. We decided to make 2 different recipes since we had so many figs: regular fig preserves and strawberry fig jam.

Next you may ask what the different between preserves and jam is. It’s pretty much the consistency. Preserves have the whole fruit or chunks of the fruit, while jam is more mashed. In our first full batch, where we made both, the jam also “set” more than the preserves, which were more runny and in more of a sauce. They are delicious either way, I think it’s just personal preference!

The first and last steps will be the same no matter what you are canning. First you have to sterilize the jars. lids, and rings. Simply place the jars, lids, and rings in boiling water for at least 5 minutes. You can let them sit in the water until you’re ready to fill them.

Now for what you put in the jars! Recipes vary slightly, as you’ll see below, but most involve the fruit, sugar, and water. We did the strawberry fig first. For that one we combined the figs and sugar in a pot. Let that cool for a while then add a box of strawberry Jell-O®. Boil for about 7 minutes. Figs are really juicy, so you don’t even need the water that a lot of recipes call for. It also, again, depends on what consistency you like. Lastly, if you want a more jam-like consistency, simply mash it all up with a potato masher. (recipe from allrecipes)

The regular fig preserve recipe did use water and we did preserves (didn’t mash it all up), so the final consistency was not as congealed, but you can use less water than the recipe calls for if you want it thicker. You toss the figs and sugar together (not over any heat) and stir occasionally, for about 15 minutes. Then add water and lemon juice and bring to a boil. Stir until sugar is dissolved. Simmer over medium heat for about 20 minutes. (recipe from Food and Wine)

Now is where your typical canning steps pick up again. When you’re ready to fill them, use a jar lifter (this is a handy one on Amazon – you can pick it up and dump it without burning your hands!) to remove from the water, and fill with your jam. I used a measuring cup to fill my jars.

After you fill them, you will wipe the jar to remove any drips and put on the lid and ring. I used a towel to hold the jar while doing this since they are still warm (glass stays hot for a while).

After all your jars are filled, you’ll fill a large stockpot half with water and bring it a boil. Use your hand jar holder and put in your sealed jars. Make sure there’s about an inch of water over the jars – add more water if needed. Let them boil for about 10 minutes then remove (jar lifter!) them to cool on a towel.

The recipes calls for 1/2 pint jars but we used pint jars. And we still got 12 jars out of it – and didn’t even use all the figs. Again, this is pretty simple, just a little time consuming, but definitely worth having homegrown and homemade jam!

Here are the recipes for both and you can download them and/or print. Enjoy!


Strawberry Fig Preserves

Ingredients

  • 4 C fresh figs, stems removed
  • 3 C white sugar
  • 1 3oz. package strawberry Jello-O
  • 5 1/2 pint canning jars with lids and rings

Instructions

  1. Sterilize the jars and lids in boiling water for at least 5 minutes.
  2. Mix figs and sugar together in a large saucepan over medium heat and cook, stirring often until sugar has dissolved.
  3. Mix in strawberry gelatin. Bring to a boil and boil for 7 minutes.
  4. Mash preserves with a potato masher (if you want jam) or don’t (if you want preserves)
  5. Pack jam into the hot, sterilized jars, filling to within 1⁄4 inch of the top.
  6. Run a knife or thin spatula around the insides of jars after they have been filled to remove any air bubbles.
  7. Wipe the rims of the jars with a moist paper towel to remove any drips. Top with lids and screw on rings.
  8. Fill a large stockpot halfway with water and bring to a boil. Lower filled jars into boiling water using a jar holder. Leave a 2-inch space between the jars. Pour in more water, if necessary, so that water level is at least 1 inch above the tops of the jars.
  9. Bring the water to a rolling boil, cover the pot, and leave for 10 minutes.
  10. Remove from pot and let cool on a dishcloth. Once cool, press on the lids to confirm that they have “popped” – lid does not move up or down.

Fig Jam

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs. figs, stemmed and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 1/2 C sugar
  • 1/4 C + 2 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1/2 C water

Instructions

  1. Sterilize the jars and lids in boiling water for at least 5 minutes.
  2. In large, nonreactive saucepan, toss the fig pieces with the sugar and let stand, stirring occasionally, for about 15 minutes, until the sugar is mostly dissolved and figs are juicy.
  3. Add lemon juice and water. Bring to a boil, stirring until the sugar is completely dissolved
  4. Simmer jam over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until fruit is soft and the liquid runs off the side of a spoon in thick, heavy drops – about 20 minutes.
  5. Optional – mash fruit with a potato masher.
  6. Pack jam into the hot, sterilized jars, filling to within 1⁄4 inch of the top.
  7. Wipe the rims of the jars with a moist paper towel to remove any drips. Top with lids and screw on rings.
  8. Fill a large stockpot halfway with water and bring to a boil. Lower filled jars into boiling water using a jar holder. Leave a 2-inch space between the jars. Pour in more water, if necessary, so that water level is at least 1 inch above the tops of the jars.
  9. Bring the water to a rolling boil, cover the pot, and leave for 10 minutes.
  10. Remove from pot and let cool on a dishcloth. Once cool, press on the lids to confirm that they have “popped” – lid does not move up or down.


1 Comment

French Boneless Chicken

I have a wonderful cookbook called Entertaining with Friends and it was made by the Monroe Carell, Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, where I was a patient through college. It was a wonderful place that does great things for kids and families. I think a friend gave me the cookbook but honestly I can’t remember.

20140216_193131

I don’t know about anyone else, but I don’t do a great job of using my cookbooks. I usually have a couple of recipes from it that I make and then it gets put to the side and forgotten about. This is one my go-to recipes from this cookbook that I wanted to share.

It’s a pretty easy recipe and we actually had everything we needed when I thought to make it recently. I remembered to take pictures a little late so they’re not quite as detailed as I usually like for recipe posts but you’ll get the idea!

Start with your ingredients and some prep. Pound and season the chicken. I also cut the breasts in half. Chop the onion and quarter the mushrooms. We accidentally chopped the mushrooms because the recipe right next to this one requires chopped mushrooms. But it’s still mushrooms all the same!

Briefly sauté the chicken then place in a baking dish. Sprinkle the cheese on top of the chicken. Then make the sauce in the same pan, adding each ingredient and letting it cook. First the onion, then mushrooms, then the wine and simmer.

Pour the onion mixture over the chicken and bake!

img_2900

We also baked some delicious brussel sprouts with our go to recipe – salt, pepper, olive oil, and balsamic vinegar. Add a salad, bread, rice, whatever other sides you want!

img_2901


French Boneless Chicken

Ingredients

  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken pieces
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Garlic powder to taste
  • 3 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp. butter
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 8 ounces mushrooms, cut into quarters
  • ⅓ to ½ C white wine
  • 1 C (4 oz.) shredded mozzarella cheese

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350⁰
  2. Pound the chicken to a uniform thickness. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and garlic powder.
  3. Heat 1 ½ Tbsp. olive oil and 1 Tbsp. butter in a skillet. Add the chicken and sauté briefly. Remove to a baking dish.
  4. Melt the remaining 1 ½ Tbsp. olive oil and 1 Tbsp. butter in the same skillet. Add the onion and sauté until tender. Add the mushrooms and sauté until tender. Stir in the wine. Simmer for a few minutes.
  5. Sprinkle cheese on top of the chicken. Top with mushroom mixture.
  6. Bake for 30-45 minutes or until bubbly and the chicken is cooked through.

Yields 4-6 servings

Happy cooking! Print the recipe here: French Boneless Chicken