Catching Katy

Reads, Eats, & Everything Else


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How to Be an Antiracist

I’m very grateful to have a book club of women who all strive to be better and support each other in that goal. We are focusing on the issue of racism and how we, as individuals and as a group, can try to make the worlds around us a more equal and just place.

How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi was not the most engaging read, I’m not going to lie. And most of it left me feeling hopeless and powerless. There was a little hope at the end, but for the most part it read like a thesis with personal anecdotes. Kendi spends each chapter discussing the different kinds of racism, which was definitely informative. I agree that the first step is to recognize how we are antiracist, both as individuals and as a society. My main takeaway was that the racist policies and policymakers should be the main focus of an antiracist’s energy, not focusing on individuals within a race. To recognize what policies and policymakers you support, vote for, encourage, and help implement (both consciously and unconsciously). And to think that there is not a deeply rooted culture of racism in this country and that every person is given the same opportunity and treatment is just ignorant.

Right now, I feel like my job is to research every person I am considering voting for. What are their views on issues and policies that are inherently racist: healthcare, housing, jobs, police brutality and oversight. And no, there will not be any candidate for any position who is perfect. And no, I do not automatically vote for someone based on party. I will vote for either side if a candidate is working for equality and justice and yes, antiracism. And I challenge everyone to do the same. Forget party affiliations and don’t focus on just one hot button issue. Take the time to look at the candidates and what they actually want to accomplish. And then take the time to vote.

Either racist policies or Black inferiority explains why White people are wealthier, healthier, and more powerful than Black people today.”

Ibram X. Kendi


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Open Book

I read two nonfiction books pretty close together. Apparently I’m trying to make up for reading none before that this year. This book came recommended from numerous people and pop stars/reality stars are always intriguing to me, although I do not watch much reality tv apart from a few years watching The Bachelor/Bachelorette franchise back in the day.

Open Book by Jessica Simpson was great! I honestly never really followed her or her career much, but she was a staple in the pop music of my teenage years. And it’s always entertaining to read about the lives of celebrities – hers and those around her – behind closed doors. She really was an open book, talking about her struggles with past abuse, issues mixing family and business, hard relationships, and personal vices. Her overall message to women and girls is a great one to love yourself for who you are. That’s something we all struggle with.

I wouldn’t say it was too serious and it kept me entertained. Definitely check it out, even if you weren’t/aren’t a Jessica Simpson super fan.


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White Fragility

I am a fiction reader through and through, but I try to consciously read at least a few nonfiction books a year to challenge my brain. Well, I’m embarrassed to say that we’re halfway through this challenging year and this is the first nonfiction I’ve read. But I’m excited to discuss with book club next week!

White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo is really a must read. And before you get all up in arms about race and racism, just give it an open-minded chance. Even if we tell ourselves and/or others we’re not racist. The truth is, all white people have racist tendencies (above and beyond prejudices) even if we don’t realize it. And there is a horrifyingly large list of societal norms that are not ok. DiAngelo shows that racism is not a simple matter of good vs. bad. There is a continuum and while none of it is good, not all racism is the white supremacist and physical attacks on black people. It’s good to admit that we are racist so we can recognize specific instances and take action to make changes in ourselves. After that, we should recognize it in other people and take action to constructively point this out to them, as well as take constructive criticism ourselves. Become an anti-racist. It’s not an easy thing for us to do and I am definitely not completely comfortable with conversations about race. But I want to be.

A big topic in the book is how white people react when they are told, be it constructively or aggressively, that they did or said something racist. I’ve never been in that situation, but I can admit that yes, my first instinct would probably be to defend myself, say I’m not racist, and try to justify what I said or did. That is what most people would do. And that is a problem. We shouldn’t have to be consoled because we feel bad about something we said or did, even if it was not intended to cause harm or offense. We need to do better to support and respect the people around us and the actions that affect them. And no, I don’t think we, as a society, becoming too sensitive. I would never venture to say that about something I will never fully understand.

The key to moving forward is what we do with out discomfort. We can use it as a door out – blame the messenger and disregard the message. Or we can use it as a door in by asking, Why does this unsettle me? What would it mean for me if this were true? How does this lens change my understanding of racial dynamics? How can my unease help reveal the unexamined assumptions I have been making? Is it possible that because I am white, there are some racial dynamics that I can’t see? Am I willing to consider that possibility? If I am not willing to do so, then why not?

Robin DiAngelo

If you’re looking for books about race and racism, this is a good one to start with. It is a little repetitive at times, but it’s not very long (not that that should matter). And I learned a lot. Just imagine what would happen if even each individual person just decided to change their own thoughts and actions towards racism. Then imagine what would happen if we held others accountable. Just start with a book/some research and a conversation with someone you trust that doesn’t necessarily have all the same beliefs/viewpoints.