Catching Katy

Reads, Eats, & Everything Else


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Peanut Butter Cookies

I can’t believe it took me this long to share this recipe – and that this is only the fourth dessert/sweets recipe I have posted on my blog. I bake a lot. I have no excuse. Anyway, this is literally the easiest cookie to make. If you are not a baker you can make these, and if you are a baker you will love how easy these are. And many of you may recognize these cookies. My mom made these a lot growing up and you can easily find the recipe online. Some call them Magic Cookies – not because of any “special” ingredient – but because they are that easy and they are that good.

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You start with your ingredients – only 4 of them. Well, technically 5, but the flour doesn’t go in the cookies. And you don’t have to have a Kitchen Aid mixer. You can use a hand mixer or you can even use a blender or food processor.

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Mix the peanut butter and sugar until combined.

 

Go ahead and beat the egg a little with a fork. Add an egg and vanilla. Dough will be moist but slightly crumbly.

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Roll dough into balls. I usually make them pretty small – max the size of a golf ball. Place onto cookie sheet.

 

Pour a little flour into a cup or bowl (just a few tablespoons). Dip a fork into the flour, then flatten the cookies with the floured fork.

Bake ’em up and sit back and enjoy! Little time, little clean up. 1 recipe makes about 20 cookies, give or take, depending on what size you make them.

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Peanut Butter Cookies

Ingredients:

  • 1 C peanut butter
  • 1 C sugar
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • flour (~2-3 Tbsp.)

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350°

In food processor or mixing bowl, combine peanut butter and sugar. Mix well.

Stir in egg and vanilla.

Roll dough into ~3/4 inch balls and place onto ungreased cookie sheet. Flatten each cookie with a floured fork.

Bake at 350° for 10-12 minutes.


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Whole30 Cheat

Hi, my name is Katy and I blatantly cheated on my Whole30 and I am ok with it. There was never going to be a full 30 days that I didn’t have some excuse to not do it. So I just went with January, knowing that I had already signed up for my favorite race of the year: the Hot Chocolate 5K. I’ve done it every year it has been in Atlanta and the whole point of racing (aside from the sweet sweatshirt) is the amazing treat at the end of the race – hot chocolate and chocolate fondue with all the dip-ins.

My Whole30 is not a full lifestyle change – I’ve known that from the start. It is to reset my habits and get used to leaving some things out a majority of the time. Perfect example: sweets. The goal is to only have sweets for the occasional treat – which is exactly what this was. And it actually worked really well – I had some chocolate, was completely satisfied and had no desire to keep eating it (as I normally would have)! I’d call it a success!

If you haven’t checked out the sweetest race, I highly recommend it.

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Whole 30

I am not really one to jump on bandwagons – especially diet ones. I love food way too much. And I typically do pretty well eating healthy (enough) and exercising. This holiday season, however, I plummeted into an eating abyss. Sweets, sugar, snacking, chocolate, late-night snacks, sweets. Oh, and by the way, my number one problem is sweets. I know it sounds crazy and luckily (or maybe hopefully) you would never notice unless you were with me constantly – but I have an unbelievable, and at times uncontrollable, sweet tooth. And eating sweets leads to just eating more junk and stuff I don’t need. And honestly, I do believe that eating better would just make me feel better overall, but again – I like food too much and haven’t been willing to give up stuff. But I want to give it a shot.

So to start the year (beginning today), I’m restarting. I’m not going on a diet. I’m letting my digestive system, metabolism, and eating habits take a break and reset. I’m going to do the Whole30 – I’ve had numerous friends do this and they all loved the results, mainly how they have felt. And it’s only for 30 days. Anyone can do anything for 30 days! Obviously the ideal, after the 30 days, is to not fall right back into the old habits, but knowing myself, once I can reset I can better control my habits.

The overall goal isn’t weight loss. I don’t even own a scale, so this would be difficult for me to track. The goal is to feel better: physically and mentally.  I know I’ll be able to do it, but I know it won’t be easy. Honestly I think the hardest part will be the planning (and maybe yogurt…I love yogurt). Anyway, I’ll post updates here: how I’m feeling, recipes, etc. If you’re also doing this to start the year, feel free to share some recipes and/or ideas. Megoirs is giving me a great start, but the more the better!

Wish me luck! And good luck to everyone on their new years resolutions, whatever it may be!

START DATE: JANUARY 5

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Lent

Surprise, surprise – guess what I gave up this year? I know it’s kind of lame to give up the same thing, every single year (really, this is going on at 5 years I think), but it really is significant to me every year. Sweets. I probably have the biggest sweet tooth of anyone I know. I actually have a second stomach for sweets – it doesn’t matter how full I am, I can still stomach something sweet. And I’m not really picky – there are favorites, definitely, but anything will really do – ice cream, candy, chocolate, brownies, cookies……

And it’s not healthy. I’m no nutritionist, but I’m pretty sure it’s not healthy to eat sweets every day. And I’m pretty much in the regular habit of eating sweets regularly. Some days, it may just be a couple jolly ranchers from the candy jar at work. But no matter the daily amount, the habit is bad. And it doesn’t help that I love to bake.

So I give it all up every year for Lent. One week in and I’m still having cravings. It fades pretty quickly, but it does seem a little more difficult then I remember it being in the past (though I would not rely on my memory to heavily) – frequent cravings and sweets around me. But that is the whole point of Lent, is it not?  To deny ourselves something that is difficult to give up – to break bad habits. Though we will never fully understand what Jesus lost for us – his earthly life – I believe it is a good practice every year, even if it is the same thing every year. For me, it is a different experience every year. The rest of my life, other things I struggle with, change and that affects my experience every year. Especially when sweets are typically what I use to cope with the things life brings (also not healthy).

So for everyone practicing Lent, happy denying!


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#55. No Sweets Zone

To say I have a sweet tooth is an understatement. I would prefer to eat some (ok, maybe most) meals consisting of nothing but sweets. My body would not prefer this. So it was a no-brainer to put #55 on my 101 list: don’t eat sweets for 2 weeks.

My timing really couldn’t have been more perfect. I began on Ash Wednesday because sweets is the obvious thing to give up for Lent. It sounds cliche, but sweets really do become a problem when it becomes a comfort/de-stress mechanism instead of doing something productive.  We are now almost 3 weeks into Lent and I honestly have not even noticed the absence of sweets. The first 2 weeks are usually the hardest, but I was over my head with my workload, food being the last thing on my mind every day, AND I got sick and was in the hospital, unable to eat a normal meal for about 8 days. Sweets were the absolute last thing I wanted.

So it really hasn’t been bad and now that I’m well into it, I’m not even craving them anymore. I didn’t even linger at the dessert table the other night during post-church dinner night! OK, yes, some Sweet Cece’s would be perfectly satisfying, but I can survive and it will still be there come Easter. (my love of baking is a completely different issue…..hard to bake when you can’t taste the goods).

I do not need sweets; I do not need sweets; I do not need sweets